Training on bike maintenance Training on bike maintenance - Harley Davidson Forum
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  1. #1
    Prospect Cosmogrl's Avatar
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    Training on bike maintenance

    I am a first time bike owner and I'm trying to learn as much as I can so that I can do my own maintenance on the bike. I was just wondering if there is some course available that is designed specifically for this?

  2. #2
    Prospect Frank's Avatar
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    There are special schools for motorcycle repair but I know of no other courses, but I've found most repairs and maintenance videos can be found on U tube. I invested in a shop manual because like you I'm new to Harley Davidson motorcycles and want to do my own maintenance and repairs if at all possible. Google is also a big help and you can even put in part numbers and it will lead you to places to find parts. I hope this is at all a help. Good Luck.
    Never ride faster then your angel can fly.

  3. #3
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    That's actually the best advice that you can give, Frank. Youtube is a bottomless source of free information and all the answers to all the questions you will ever have concerning your bike. Why pay for something you can get on youtube for free?

  4. #4
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    Great advice. I would add that on top of all those free Youtube tutorials, there are millions of articles on every conceivable question you may have. So just type your question and search, and the rest is up to you. Best of all, you have this wonderful community here to help you.

  5. #5
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    I agree that YouTube tutorials are the best and easiest way out. Who currently does your bike maintenance? The same person could easily take you through until you are able to grasp a few things here and there.

  6. #6
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    I agree. It would be easiest to learn from the person who is already doing your maintenance. Watching videos on Youtube is one thing, but it can't beat actually doing the work in a practical way.

  7. #7
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    Never try what you are unsure about; it could easily render the bike unusable. Learn the ropes slowly but always remember that the reason that we have dealers and mechs is so that they can handle the complicated tasks.

  8. #8
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    There are many UTUBE videos that will give you some of the basics. Watch the ones that are relevant to your needs. Personally I would not recommend any "heavy" type of service on your motorcycle. Changing fluids, keeping the tires full, and washing your machine is a very good start. By all means, buy yourself a service manual for your bike. It is amazing how much information is available in a regular Harley Davidson service manual. I always hand wash my bikes, always checking for loose parts. I also remove the seat, saddle bags, and side covers on a bagger in order to get the areas under the covers and seat clean and check the parts and connectors, making sure that they are tightly fastened.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Hangaround Kickman's Avatar
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    I fix broken stuff people tried to do on their own. The best advice I can give you as 17 year dealer tech, know your skill level and be honest with yourself when deciding what that level is.

    As other have stated their is a wealth of knowledge out there, but its an absolute must that you at minimum purchase the factory expensive repair manual. The Electrical diagnostics manual is also a must in my opinion, other will disagree, but the diag manual has so so so much more to offer.

    lastly, invest in good tools. Life time tools, because not owning the right tool may get you in hot water fast.

    There are many many factory tools/ speciality tools, if you encounter a job that requires that, I encourage you to again be honest with your skill level.

    I was breaking motorcycles faster than I could ride them in the early mid 90s, then I spent a fortune on MMI. That landed me a dealer position, which I've maintained since 2001.

    I can honestly tell you that if your not going to make a career out it, then don't waste your money. Most of the resources you will need are all there for your reading and viewing pleasure!

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